• Drama
  • Writer and Director: Alan Fielden
  • Cast includes: Anna Martine, Jack McMahon, James Murray Perton and Lydia Orange
  • St Leonard’s Church, Shoreditch, London
  • Until the 2 March 2014
  • Time: 19.30
  • Review by Chris Bridges
  • 7th of February 2014
Sun
4.0Reviewer's Rating

A group of people sit around a table, eating the remains of the food that they have left, waiting for a major event to occur. Conjoined twins glory in the freedom they have been granted when the fabric of society has changed and they can escape the world of hospitals. A woman reveals that she’s been having a long-term affair but none of it maters fully as the human race is on the brink of extinction.

Sun explores major themes, such as how we engage with each other as human beings. Added to this, the performers offer an enhancing element; namely how imminent disaster would change the way we behave towards one another.  This play has a slightly experimental air; toying with absurdist concepts, serious drama and hyper-reality as well as a healthy blend of humour. Largely, the concept works and there were only a few moments where the piece fell slightly.

The setting of the piece was inspired, the huge partly lit church echoing to the sounds of the action and repeatedly transformed by innovative light and sound design. The audience shuffle in and are seated nervously on pews inside the vast nave of the church, not knowing what to expect. The actors are, at times, uncomfortably close but this only adds to the intensity of this brave and thought provoking play.

For those that like their theatre linear and straightforward then this might prove difficult viewing. For anyone willing to try something bold, thought provoking and experimental then this comes highly recommended. Just one tip though: wear plenty of warm clothes. Cavernous churches in an English winter aren’t the warmest of places. I left the church feeling cold, slightly dazed yet ultimately glad of the chance to witness this spectacle.

About The Author

Chris Bridges is an avid theatre goer who is based in South London. He’s been a lifelong theatre fan and loves dramas, musicals and comedy. He is a big fan of Tennessee Williams and has been known to travel extraordinary distances, queue for hours or pay exorbitant amounts to catch anything by Tennessee. Chris is also a vintage fanatic and when not lounging in the stalls in a three piece 50s suit, he can be found lolling on a sofa in his art deco sitting room.

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