• Drama
  • By Oscar Wilde
  • Director: Anastasia Revi
  • Cast: Denise Moreno, Konstantinos Kavakiotis, Helen Bang, Matthew Wade, Tobias Deacon, Benoit Gouttenoire, Annabelle Brown
  • Hoxton Hall, London
  • Until 11th of February 2017
  • Review by Natalia Kolosova
  • 13 February 2017
Salome
3.0Reviewer's Rating

This production of “Salome “, performed in the  beautifully restored Hoxton Hall, is supposed to be “decadent”. However ,we can see a very eclectic performance. We are invited to  King Herod’s birthday feast  and the audience sits  on both sides of a long table as the guests. The king himself,performed by Konstantinos Kavakiotis in an almost cabaret manner, does not seem at all frightening, and is almost a figure of fun.

Salome, performed by Denise Moreno, is at first dressed in a tutu, but the reason for this is never explained. Her feelings are also revealed by a woman who is stated in the programme to be Moon, and who plays out her emotions on musical instruments and in song.

The company has  placed Oscar Wilde’s photograph among those of the production crew in a clear attempt to bring his play closer to our day. The production also seems to employ drawings of Aubrey Beardsley to create poses for the characters. However, there is no sense of atmosphere of the age of decadence in the performance. Much of the show seems to be melodramatic and overacted.

The famous dance of Salome is very sexualised,which is in stark contrast to her appearance throughout the performance. Denise Moreno reveals the young girl’s obsession well, and the scene with the murdered Iokanaan is very moving. Unlike many other productions, we are not shown a dummy head of Iokanaan brought on stage. Instead of that his whole body is covered with the red fabric used by Salome in her dance, so that we can only see his head placed on a plate, which is an effective theatrical way of showing his dead head.

The performance shows a story of passion and destruction, but does not give a clear message. The aestheticism which is essential to Oscar Wilde’s works is not very evident in the performance, and the whole attempt seems to be rushed. However, if one is not seeking too much depth in the production, it is gripping and thoroughly enjoyable, and time passes imperceptibly. The very close proximity of the audience  to the action also increases the impact of the production.

About The Author

Profile photo of Natalia Kolosova

Natalia Kolosova, PhD, is a theatre and opera critic and teacher of drama and theatre history. She studied Theatre at St.Petersburg State Academy of Theatre Arts and at Stockholm University. She wrote her dissertation about Lev Dodin and his Maly Drama Theatre and also a book about the opera singer Vladimir Galouzine. She currently lives in London and enjoys a busy theatre life there. She is also an accomplished artist and loves painting and sculpture.

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