• Children Theatre
  • Original Idea: Michael Morpurgo
  • Producer: Olivier Award nominated Wizard
  • Cast: Danyah Miller
  • Vaudeville Theatre, London
  • Until 30 August 2015
  • For Age 6 and above
  • Review by Caroline Perret
  • 16 August 2015
I Believe in Unicorns
5.0Reviewer's Rating

I Believe in Unicorns is the theatrical adaption of celebrated Michael Morpurgo’s best-selling children’s story and is typically amazingly magical and thought-provoking, acting out the preciousness and power of books. Together with gentle audience participation and subtle humour, it is greatly appealing to both children and accompanying adults.

This charming show takes place in a cleverly designed decor of a village library full of books, which uncover stories as well as secrets and different worlds with their pages as the story unravels: pop-up farms and country houses, pop-up bears, milk and napkins as well as magical kites coming out of books! Very imaginatively, the books in the backdrop also become stepping stones, a camping tent and a sledge, as we hear the life-story of Tomas by fabulous and energetic narrator Danyah Miller.

Tomas is more interested in nature and in playing in the hills where he lives, than in reading and studying for school. He however soon changes his mind when he meets the Unicorn Lady in his local library, because her unicorn gives her the magical power to spontaneously invent the most amazing stories – a prowess which is enacted in front of our very eyes in the play by our narrator.

To add to the diversity of the show, there is an innovative use of projections onto the decor as well as a range of sounds which help us remember that we can think, dream, and even travel the whole world just through reading… even go to the moon! And that one story can lead to another, and another.

So, why don’t you let yourself and your children be enthralled and charmed, and enjoy imaginative story-telling at its most joyful.

About The Author

Profile photo of Caroline Perret

Caroline Perret is a researcher and teacher in the Social History of Art at the University of Westminster. She is particularly interested in the impact of war on culture, from painting and sculpture to poetry and cinema, in which she publishes and gives conferences. She loves unusual artistic performances and theatre plays, anything that might expand her horizons and fulfill her hunger for new experiences.


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